This generic sourdough starter recipe works with any grain flour, except oats. Use it to make an active, rich-tasting starter that can be incorporated into any sourdough bread recipe, gluten-free or glutenous.

Instructions include "Putting the starter to sleep", "Feeding" the starter, and "Waking up" the starter.

Yield: About 1 quart ready-to-use sourdough starter.

Time to make: 10 minutes per day for 10 days

Tools needed: 1 Qt or larger glass, plastic or stainless steel container with lid. Measuring spoons and cups. Stirring spoon. Zip-lock bag.

A fuss-free, tasty and very tangy sourdough starter, including instructions for "Putting to sleep" and "Waking up." 

Yield: about 2 cups "Sleeping" sourdough starter.

Time to make: 45 minutes active, spread over 4 days.

Equipment needed: Measuring Tablespoon. Stirring spoon. Plastic, stainless steel, or glass container with lid. Clean spice grinder or coffee grinder or home grain grinder.


The triangular shape of a shortbread cut from a circle could be called a cookie, or a biscuit. No matter the name, the result is excellent, and the path to get there, very easy. A few minutes prep to create "sleeping" sourdough starter gives you the flour blend you need, then a short list of ingredients and a quarter-hour at the kitchen counter yield days worth of treats. You'll never look at plain old rice flour the same way again.


Yield:  Eight, 1-ounce triangular shortbreads.

This very tart sourdough Pullman loaf gets its hue from the use of purple haze sourdough starter. Made with whole-grain brown rice, oat flour and coarse buckwheat meal, the bread is a pleasure to taste, a delight to chew, and a star sandwich performer.

Yield: one, 18-ounce Pullman loaf.

Time to make: 20 minutes active. 6 - 12 hours proof (depending on temperature). 90 minutes baking.

This tart and tasty but very easy loaf uses a whole-grain quinoa sourdough starter described HERE. The bread rises entirely from natural leavens, a process that takes longer than bread leavened with commercial yeast. At room temperature (72 F) the loaf will be ready to bake in about 7 hours. If you have a "Bread proof" oven setting (100 F), that time can be cut to 3 hours. Baking in a pouch or bag as described ensures a crispy crust.

This big, tasty hemisphere is a surprisingly easy project. An energetic pre-dough, made from natural sourdough starter, provides great flavor and vigorous rise,. This bread yields solid, sandwich-perfect slices, is very slow to stale, and resists mold. Leave it on your kitchen counter and slice as needed - it's good for a minimum of 4 days.

 

Yield: one, 16-ounce sourdough Boule - enough bread for two adults to enjoy for three days.

This attractive, unusual bread gets its dark lilac hue from fresh-ground black rice flour. Leavened with quinoa sourdough starter and shaped into a fat hemisphere, it's tasty, rich and very slow-to stale. The solid crumb makes for easy slicing as thin or thick as you want, and the loaf is big enough to yield full-size sandwiches

Yield: one, 16-ounce sourdough Boule - enough bread for two adults to enjoy for three days.

Untraditional in every sense, this sourdough flatbread is a tasty delight: smoky, tart, spicy and cheesy with sweet notes. With a teff sourdough starter, a dough spiced with abundant black pepper, and a topping of cheddar cheese, bacon, and pear juice, (among other ingredients) it references multiple countries of origin and gratifies in unexpected ways. This recipe will yield two, 12-inch flatbreads or one, 20-inch one.

These potato-softened buns are a delight for children and seniors alike, providing a welcome, tender wrap for your favorite tube steak. This dough can be portioned into burger buns or loaf bread too, all of which taste great, hold up to the chewiest, most mustard-drenched meat treats, and freeze easily. 

Deeply complex flavor from minimum ingredients is one way to describe Japanese cooking, and these cookies fit that bill. They're very tender and moderately sweet with a tiny touch of mushroom and a parade of indescribable but excellent tastes. You'll be amazed by how easy, and how rewarding, they are.

Making koji rice is an involved and finicky process, but cakes of koji can be found in Asian supermarkets. The batches I've made are much sweeter than commercial varieties; you'll want to taste what you obtain, and if not sweet, add 1/3 more sugar.